CANCER DAY 4TH February

posted in: Uncategorized | 0
Jacqui Gathumbi, 38 years old, collapsed while she was 7 months pregnant. She became distant and unaware of her surroundings, was diagnosed with a brain tumor. One month before it was surgically removed in Oct 2013 she gave birth to her daughter Angel. It took the removal of the tumor at Kijabe Hospital for Jacqui to regain her awareness and even know she had given birth. After the operation she underwent 27 sessions of radiotherapy to kill the remaining 1% of the tumor. The Faraja Cancer Support Trust, a charitable trust founded in 2010 with the mission to improve the quality of life for cancer patients and their families by providing information, emotional and practical support, counselling, and complimentary therapies to cancer patients and their carers. This image is part of an on-going personal project looking at the rise of cancer in Africa, that it is not just a stereo-typical western disease but because of diet, stress and environmental changes it is now very much now becoming a part of African life. Photographer Georgina Goodwin. Copyright 2014 Georgina Goodwin. All Rights Reserved.
Jacqui Gathumbi, 38 years old, collapsed while she was 7 months pregnant. She became distant and unaware of her surroundings, was diagnosed with a brain tumor. One month before it was surgically removed in Oct 2013 she gave birth to her daughter Angel. It took the removal of the tumor at Kijabe Hospital for Jacqui to regain her awareness and even know she had given birth. After the operation she underwent 27 sessions of radiotherapy to kill the remaining 1% of the tumor. The Faraja Cancer Support Trust, a charitable trust founded in 2010 with the mission to improve the quality of life for cancer patients and their families by providing information, emotional and practical support, counselling, and complimentary therapies to cancer patients and their carers.
This image is part of an on-going personal project looking at the rise of cancer in Africa, that it is not just a stereo-typical western disease but because of diet, stress and environmental changes it is now very much now becoming a part of African life.
Photographer Georgina Goodwin. Copyright 2014 Georgina Goodwin. All Rights Reserved.

Serena Hotels in Partnership with various cancer support centers across East Africa and Mozambique are joining various organizations across the globe to mark the World Cancer Day. On World Cancer Day 2018, the world unites against this disease that knows no borders and represents one of humanity’s most pressing, emotionally draining and financial concerns.

Under the campaign theme ‘We can. I can.’ World Cancer Day represents a unique opportunity to draw attention to what can be done to address cancer, save millions of avoidable deaths and, in turn, support global economic growth and development. The world’s leading international cancer NGO, the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC), urges corporations to focus their business on products and services that improve public health.

Under the banner ‘We can. I can.’ the  4th of February 2018 encourages people to be more active – in every sense – in the fight against a disease that, in less than two decades, will directly affect 21.7 million people globally per year.

“It is gratifying for Serena Hotels to demonstrate its support during the World Cancer Day, as it allows our Staff, Guests and Partners to reflect on what they can do as an individual, and as part of a community, to make a difference in reducing the encumbrances related to cancer,” said Mr. Mahmud Jan Mohamed, Managing Director, Serena Hotels. He further adds that “by integrating the theme of ‘Support through Sport’, Serena Hotels is able to highlight how everyone has a potential role to play in improving the cancer experience, as sport allows everyone at every level to participate and get involved.” In a world of shrinking time, information deluge and stress impact, the need for inner peace is critical and it is through the Serena Maisha Spa and Fitness Center that we are able to promote healthy lifestyle and the concept of ‘Mind, Body and Spirit’ to our Staff and Guests.

Aside from prevention, a growing body of evidence shows that physical activity significantly helps cancer patients, not only to manage the life-altering side-effects of treatment such as fatigue, depression and heart damage, but also in reducing the risk of the disease worsening or recurring. Research shows, for example, a breast cancer patient’s risk of recurrence and dying from the disease can be reduced by up to 40 per cent by doing recommended levels of physical activity.

Leave a Reply